Ghosts of Abu Ghraib   3 comments

The familiar and disturbing pictures of torture at Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison raise many troubling questions: How did torture become an accepted practice at Abu Ghraib? Did U.S. government policies make it possible? How much damage has the aftermath of Abu Ghraib had on America’s credibility as a defender of freedom and human rights around the world?

Acclaimed filmmaker Rory Kennedy (HBO’s “Indian Point: Imagining the Unimaginable”) looks beyond the headlines to investigate the psychological and political context in which torture occurred when the powerful documentary GHOSTS OF ABU GHRAIB.

“How could ordinary American soldiers come to engage in such monstrous acts?” Kennedy asks. “What policies were put into place that allowed this behavior to flourish while protections granted to prisoners under the Geneva Conventions were ignored?”

“These photographs from Abu Ghraib have come to define the United States,” says Scott Horton, chairman, Committee on International Law, NYC Bar Association. “The U.S., which was viewed as certainly one of the principal advocates of human rights and…the dignity of human beings in the world, suddenly is viewed as a principle expositor of torture.”

For the first time, GHOSTS OF ABU GHRAIB features both the voices of ,i victims (interviewed in Turkey after arduous attempts to meet with them) and guards directly involved in torture at the prison. Conducted by Kennedy, these remarkably candid, in-depth interviews shed light on the abuses in an unprecedented manner.

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Posted October 29, 2013 by kitokinimi in Uncategorized

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