The legacy of biblical King Herod   Leave a comment

 

Elaborate clay chandelier fashioned as a multi-nuzzled lamp, 1st century BCE.

 Source: The Israel Museum/Meidad Suchowolski

 

Corinthian capital, from Herod’s palace in Jericho.

 Source: The Israel Museum/Meidad Suchowolski

 

Magnificent glass drinking cups from the time of Augustus, 1st century CE. This type of ware of was used in the lavish banquets of the Roman aristocracy and was no doubt used in Herod’s palaces too.

Source: Metropolital Museum of Art

 

Footed marble basin decoarted with Silenoi heads. The basin was probably given to Herod as a gift from Emperor Augustus or his second in command, Marcus Agrippa, the 1st century BCE.

Source: The Israel Museum/Meidad Suchowolski

 

Professor Ehud Netzer and Roi Porat in the Royal room of the theater at Herodium at the end of the excavation.

Source: The Herodium Expedition/Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Gabi Laron

 

A detailed model of the Second Temple: Mariamme, Phasael and Hippicus, the multi-storied

towers of the citadel built by Herod in Jerusalem.

Source: The Israel Museum

 

Ionic capital from the upper story of Herod’s mausoleum.

Source: The Israel Museum/Meidad Suchowolski

 

Portrait of Marc Anthony on a gold coin from 39 BCE.

Source: American Nurismatic Society/Mike Gasvoda

 

Pilaster made of stucco, from the royal room at the theater in Herodium, 1st century BCE.

Source: The Herodium Expedition/Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Gabi Laron

 

 

Bronze Portrait of Marcus Agrippa, right hand man of Augustus Agrippa, who was a close friend of Herod who visited the kingdom in 15 BCE.

Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Handle of a footed marble basin decorated with Silenoi heads. The basin was probably given to Herod as a gift from Emperor Augustus or his second in command, Marcus Agrippa, 1st century BCE.

Source: Israel Museum/Meidad Suchowolski

 

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Posted October 8, 2013 by kitokinimi in Uncategorized

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